Tag Archives: facebook

Want to Name our Wine? Become a Fan.

6 Oct

What do you do when you want some social media love?  Announce a contest to name one of your wines, hire Guy Kawaski co-founder of Alltop.com to judge it, and make becoming a Facebook Fan of the winery a requirement to enter the contest.  All of which Olson Ogden Wines is doing right now in a contest which runs through October 15.  The winner will receive a case of said wine, which is to be an under $20 “straightforward, easy drinking, and fruit forward, uncomplicated red wine that may be made up of multiple varietals including Syrah, Grenache, Pinot Noir, Merlot and Cabernet” and recognition on the label itself.  The catch? entrants must be 21 (of course) and submissions are only accepted on the winery’s Facebook Fan Page.

As of right now, Olsen Ogden has 552 fans on its Facebook page.  How many will they rack up by October 15th?  And, what will this social media stunt ultimately do for their brand?

In Campania Where Sparkling Wine Grows on Trees

27 Aug

 

Vite Maritata

Vite Maritata

 

I have a thing for bizarre wines.  Especially if they’re white.  Doubly so if they’re sparkling.  Just so happens I came across such a fascinating find the other day, an Italian sparkler called Grotta del Sole Asprinio d’Aversa.  Admittedly, I had no idea what it was, but a little cursory research via the Oxford Companion to Wine (Many thanks, Jancis.) turned up two facts: 1) that Asprinio is a specialty of Campania; and 2) that it is likely identical to Greco di Tufo.  A little more digging on the internet and another fun fact emerged:  this particular variety grows on trees.  That’s right, the vines are actually intertwined with poplar trees in a traditional method called vite maritata, or married vine.  They can reach 30 or even 50 meters in height, meaning farmers with ladders custom-made for the purpose are required to harvest them.  So while I’m blogging, emailing, and Twittering away, a farmer in a little corner of Italy is climbing a narrow, handmade ladder to check on his Asprinio grapes.  Sigh.

Having found this bottle and done this little bit of research reminds me why I love wine.  Beacause it’s beautiful in its simplicity, and it connects us to humanity in a way Facebook never will.     

Would love to know if anyone has experience with other interesting traditional harvest techniques…

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